Women’s Health Week: Make Your Health a Priority

Statistics indicate that women—on average—live approximately five years longer than men, but this longevity, unfortunately, is not linked to better overall health. According to the Health Resources and Services Administration, women have more physically and mentally unhealthy days than men. Part of this disparity is related to age; because of their longer life expectancy, women are at greater risk for age-related conditions, like Alzheimer disease. Beyond that, however, women experience gender-specific health care needs throughout their lives and are more likely than men to have certain conditions, including asthma, arthritis, migraine headaches, osteoporosis, thyroid disorders, and chronic pain.

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Just Released: Pregnancy Information for Teens, 3rd Ed.

According to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. teenage birth rate reached a historic low in 2015, at 22.3 births per 1,000 women aged 15–19. Despite this encouraging news, the U.S. teenage birth rate retained its distinction of
being the highest among industrialized countries, emphasizing the nation’s need for continued efforts at helping young women avoid unplanned pregnancies.

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May Is Mental Health Month

Mental health issues affect a large segment of society in the United States — adults, young adults, and children. In a give year, approximately one in five adults (43.8 million, or 18.5%) and the same proportion of young adults aged 13 to 18 (one in five, or 21.4%) experience some form of mental illness. And younger children are not immune — for those aged 8 to 15, the estimate is 13%.

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Just Released: Eye Care Sourcebook, 5th Edition

Recent statistics show that more than 39 million Americans have low vision or a disorder that can lead to it. Together these impairments cost $68 billion in annual direct healthcare costs, as well as lost productivity and diminished quality of life.

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Just Released: Suicide Information for Teens, 3rd Edition

 

Teens often face a host of stressors and confusing feelings as they grow through the adolescent years. The emotions associated with puberty, self-doubt, confusion about the future, family problems, and school pressures can sometimes seem overwhelming.

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6 Facts about Teens and Health Literacy

There’s nothing surprising about teens searching the internet for health-related information. But knowing why they search and how they process what they find offer significant clues for libraries and school media centers looking to support them.

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Just Released: Cancer Survivorship Sourcebook, 2nd Edition

There are more than 15.5 million cancer survivors alive in the United States today, and that number will grow to more than 20 million by 2026—a number made possible through better and earlier detection of cancer, advances in medical technologies, and improved treatments.

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Hold the Salt (and Pass on That Bread Basket)

Everyone needs salt. The cells in our muscles and nerves need it to function and it helps our bodies keep fluids in balance.

But most everyone knows that too much salt isn’t good for you. What’s not so clear is where we get most of the sodium in our diet (hint: it’s not just that shaker on your grandmother’s table or an unholy combination of bacon, french fries, and pretzels).

In honor of World Salt Awareness Week, here are five fast facts to share with your patrons and students about salt intake and what it means to your well being from Health Reference Series Online.

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