Honoring Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

In the United States, teens and young women experience the highest rates of relationship violence. In fact, 1 in 10 female high-schoolers say they have been physically abused by a dating partner in the past year.

Omnigraphics wants you to know that there’s a lot you can do to prevent teen dating violence and abuse for yourself, your children, or your friends and loved ones.

Some signs of teen dating abuse include:

  • Constantly texting or sending instant messages (IMs) to monitor you
  • Insisting on getting serious very quickly
  • Acting very jealous or bossy
  • Pressuring you to do sexual things
  • Posting sexual photos of you online without permission
  • Threatening to hurt you or themselves if you break up
  • Blaming you for the abuse

If you aren’t sure whether the relationship you, your friend, or your child is in is abusive or not you can take this quiz which may help you find out.

Leaving an Abusive Dating Relationship

If you think you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship, learn more about how to get help. See a doctor or nurse to take care of any physical problems and reach out for support for your emotional pain. Friends, family, and mental health professionals all can help. If you’re in immediate danger, dial 911.

Here are some tips to keep in mind about ending an abusive dating relationship:

  • Create a safety plan, like where you can go if you are in danger.
  • Make sure you have a working cellphone handy in case you need to call for help.
  • Create a secret code with people you trust. That way, if you are with your partner, you can get help without having to say you need help.
  • If you’re breaking up with someone you see at your high school or college, you can get help from a guidance counselor, advisor, teacher, school nurse, dean’s office, or principal. You also might be able to change your class schedules or even transfer to another school.
  • If you have a job, talk to someone you trust at work. Your human resources department or employee assistance program (EAP) may be able to help.
  • Try to avoid walking or riding alone.
  • Be smart about technology. Don’t share your passwords. Don’t post your schedule on Facebook, and keep your settings private.

Myths and Facts about Teen Dating Violence


Myth: It is only maltreatment if it is violent

Fact: Neglect, emotional abuse, sexual coercion, and statutory rape often occur without physical violence or leaving marks.


Myth: Child maltreatment only happens in lower-income or rural families.

Fact: Child maltreatment happens across all socioeconomic groups, and it happens in urban and rural environments.


Myth: Dating violence is always males hurting their girlfriends.

Fact: Females can be perpetrators to their male partners, and dating violence occurs in same-sex relationships.


Myth: Youth usually tell someone that they are being abused or thinking about suicide.

Fact: Most youth do not tell. Shame or fear that others will blame the victim or will not believe reports of abuse prevent many from speaking out. Most youth do not tell an adult about suicidal thoughts or plans; some youth will tell their peers.


Parents can play a big role in teaching kids about healthy relationships.

  • Be a role model – treat your kids and others with respect.
  • Start talking to your kids about healthy relationships early – before they start dating. Here are a few tips to help you communicate with your teen.
  • Get involved with efforts to prevent dating violence at your teen’s school.
  • If you are worried about your teen, call the National Dating Abuse Helpline at 1-866-331-9474 or text “loveis” to 22522.

Everyone has the right to a healthy and safe relationship free of abuse. And, everyone has a hand in ending dating violence. Love has many definitions, but abuse isn’t one of them! If you or someone you know has a question about a relationship, healthy or unhealthy, visit loveisrespect.org or text “loveis” to 22522. Loveisrespect is there for you 24/7/365! Remember, hands unite when it comes to ending dating violence.

World Cancer Day

 

Every year, nearly 1.5 million Americans receive a diagnosis of cancer. Cancer is not a single disease, however. It is many different diseases that all share one common characteristic: Some of the body’s cells do not die when they should. Instead they continue to grow and divide. Through this process, cancer cells can damage the body’s tissues and organs, leading to a broad array of symptoms and even death. The cellular changes that lead to the development of cancer are sometimes inherited but they may also result from environmental or lifestyle factors. Although the survival rates for many types of cancer have improved in recent years and innovative treatment protocols are being developed, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States.

World Cancer Day takes place every year on February 4th and is the single initiative under which the world can unite to raise the profile of cancer in a positive and inspiring way.

In honor of this important observance we have included a free reference to Chapters 1-3 of Cancer Sourcebook 7th Edition. Chapters 1-3 provides a general overview of Cancer and includes the following topics:

  • What is Cancer
  • Cancer Terms
  • Cell Biology of Cancer
  • Cancer Classification
  • Cancer Symptoms

DOWNLOAD THIS FREE RESOURCE HERE


For more in-depth information on Cancer please feel free to check out Omnigraphics’ full selection of Sourcebooks covering the topic.

World AIDS Day 2017

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 1.2 million Americans are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

An estimated 50,000 people in the United States are newly infected with HIV each year. This devastating disease attacks the immune system and affects all parts of the body, eventually leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), it’s most deadly and advanced stage, for which there is currently no cure. Yet there is hope for the many Americans living with HIV infection or AIDS. Researchers are developing new and more effective drug combinations, and scientists are growing ever closer to a vaccine. Improvements in medication and earlier diagnosis mean that those infected with HIV are living longer, healthier, and more productive lives. Still, many Americans are unaware of even the basic facts about HIV—how it is transmitted, how HIV progresses to AIDS, and how HIV and AIDS are treated.

World AIDS Day is important because it reminds the public and government that HIV has not gone away – there is still a vital need to raise money, increase awareness, fight prejudice and improve education.

The fight is not just about the virus. For people living with HIV, ignorance and discrimination can still limit opportunities, preventing them from living full and happy lives. HIV means you are more likely to live in poverty, and more likely to have poor mental health.

In an effort to end stigma, end HIV transmission and end the isolation experienced by people living with HIV, for good please download and share Chapter 36 of AIDS Sourcebook, Sixth Edition, which offers advice on coping with an HIV/AIDS diagnosis.

Download “Coping with an HIV/AIDS Diagnosis” from AIDS Sourcebook, Sixth Edition here.

For additional resources and information on World AIDS Day please visit www.worldaidsday.org.

National Diabetes Month 2017

Diabetes is a chronic disorder characterized by high levels of blood sugar. It can lead to a host of complications, including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, blindness, kidney disease, nervous system disease, and limb amputation. Although many of the complications of diabetes occur over long periods of time, poorly controlled blood glucose levels can also result in acute medical emergencies, such as seizures or coma or even death.

The number of people with diabetes in the United States is growing. According to the 2014 publication from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 29.1 million children and adults in the United States are living with diabetes. Among people aged twenty and older, 208,000 people have been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2). Furthermore, an estimated 86 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. Despite its prevalence, many Americans are unaware of the basic facts about diabetes and the progress being made in the fight against it. For example, new forms of treatment are being developed making it easier to manage, and work on pancreatic islet transplantation and an artificial pancreas offer hope for an eventual cure.

Diabetes Sourcebook, Sixth Edition provides basic consumer health information about the different types of diabetes and how they are diagnosed. Specifically, Chapter 8 covers the importance of eating healthy and how diet and nutrition effects ones body as it pertains to Diabetes prevention and management.

Questions answered in this chapter include:

  • Why eat healthy foods?
  • How does food affect my body?
  • What should I eat?
  • What about sugar, sweets, and desserts? Am I allowed to eat them again?
  • How much should I eat?
  • What happens when I eat foods containing carbohydrates?
  • How much carbohydrate do I need each day?
  • How can I find out how much carbohydrate is in the foods I eat?

In efforts to spread awareness of Diabetes and in honor of National Diabetes Month please feel free to download Chapter 8 of Diabetes Sourcebook, 6th Ed. here for free.

 

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

What Is Domestic Violence?

• Nearly 3 in 10 women and 1 in 10 men in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by a partner and report a related impact on their functioning.

• IPV (Intimate Partner Violence) resulted in 2,340 deaths in 2007—accounting for 14% of all homicides. Of these deaths, 70% were females and 30% were males.

• The medical care, mental health services, and lost productivity (e.g., time away from work) cost of IPV was an estimated $8.3 billion in 2003 for women alone. These numbers underestimate the problem. Many victims do not report IPV to police, friends, or family. Victims may think others will not believe them or that the police cannot help.

How does IPV (Intimate Partner Violence) affect health?

IPV can affect health in many ways. The longer the violence goes on, the more serious the effects. Many victims suffer physical injuries. Some are minor like cuts, scratches, bruises, and welts. Others are more serious and can cause death or disabilities. These include broken bones, internal bleeding, and head trauma.

Not all injuries are physical. IPV can also cause emotional harm. Victims may have trauma symptoms. This includes flashbacks, panic attacks, and trouble sleeping. Victims often have low self-esteem. They may have a hard time trusting others and being in relationships. The anger and stress that victims feel may lead to eating disorders and depression. Some victims even think about or commit suicide.

IPV is also linked to negative health outcomes, such as chronic pain, difficulty sleeping, activity limitations, and poor physical and mental health.

IPV is also linked to harmful health behaviors. Victims may try to cope with their trauma in unhealthy ways. This includes smoking, drinking, taking drugs, or having risky sex.

 How can we prevent IPV?

The goal is to stop IPV before it begins. There is a lot to learn about how to prevent IPV. We do know that strategies that promote healthy behaviors in relationships are important. Programs that teach young people skills for dating can prevent violence. These programs can stop violence in dating relationships before it occurs.

We know less about how to prevent IPV in adults. However, some programs that teach healthy relationship skills seem to help stop violence before it ever starts. Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. Domestic violence occurs in both opposite-sex and same-sex relationships and can happen to intimate partners who are married, living together, or dating.

Domestic violence not only affects those who are abused, but also has a substantial effect on family members, friends, co-workers, other witnesses, and the community at large. Children, who grow up witnessing domestic violence, are among those seriously affected by this crime. Frequent exposure to violence in the home not only predisposes children to numerous social and physical problems, but also teaches them that violence is a normal way of life—therefore, increasing their risk of becoming society’s next generation of victims and abusers.

 Getting Help

If you are someone you know is effected by any form of domestic abuse or violence we encourage you to download or share the free resources below providing information on how help can be found.

Domestic Violence Resources

Domestic Violence Hotlines

State Child Abuse Reporting Numbers

Shelter for Pets of Domestic Violence Victims

October Is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

A woman born in the United States today has a 1 in 8 chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer at some point during her life. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States. National Breast Cancer Awareness Month focuses attention on the disease and is chance to raise awareness about the importance of screening and the early detection.

Below is a link to download a directory of resources from Breast Cancer Sourcebook which lists organizations that provide information, support, and advocacy for people with breast cancer.

Directory of Organizations That Offer Information and Financial Assistance to People with Breast Cancer

Comprehensive information about the risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer is available in Breast Cancer Sourcebook, 5th Edition.

Just Released: Mental Health Information for Teens, 5th Edition

Adolescence is difficult. Not only are teens under stress to be liked, do well in school, and get along with family, they must cope with hormonal changes and make important decisions about their lives. Continue reading “Just Released: Mental Health Information for Teens, 5th Edition”

Men’s Health Week — June 12-18, 2017

On average, men live five years less than women and die at higher rates than women from the top causes of death. Men are also more likely than women to smoke and drink, more likely to engage in risky behaviors, and more likely to put off checkups and regular preventative care. National Men’s Health Week, observed annually in the week leading up Father’s Day, is intended to heighten awareness of preventable health problems, and to encourage men and boys to seek regular medical advice and early detection and treatment for disease and injury.

Continue reading “Men’s Health Week — June 12-18, 2017”

Just Released: Stroke Sourcebook, 4th Edition

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), stroke kills nearly 130,000 Americans each year—one out of every 18 deaths— making stroke the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Continue reading “Just Released: Stroke Sourcebook, 4th Edition”

Women’s Health Week: Make Your Health a Priority

Statistics indicate that women—on average—live approximately five years longer than men, but this longevity, unfortunately, is not linked to better overall health. According to the Health Resources and Services Administration, women have more physically and mentally unhealthy days than men. Part of this disparity is related to age; because of their longer life expectancy, women are at greater risk for age-related conditions, like Alzheimer disease. Beyond that, however, women experience gender-specific health care needs throughout their lives and are more likely than men to have certain conditions, including asthma, arthritis, migraine headaches, osteoporosis, thyroid disorders, and chronic pain.

Continue reading “Women’s Health Week: Make Your Health a Priority”