Domestic Violence Awareness Month

What Is Domestic Violence?

• Nearly 3 in 10 women and 1 in 10 men in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by a partner and report a related impact on their functioning.

• IPV (Intimate Partner Violence) resulted in 2,340 deaths in 2007—accounting for 14% of all homicides. Of these deaths, 70% were females and 30% were males.

• The medical care, mental health services, and lost productivity (e.g., time away from work) cost of IPV was an estimated $8.3 billion in 2003 for women alone. These numbers underestimate the problem. Many victims do not report IPV to police, friends, or family. Victims may think others will not believe them or that the police cannot help.

How does IPV (Intimate Partner Violence) affect health?

IPV can affect health in many ways. The longer the violence goes on, the more serious the effects. Many victims suffer physical injuries. Some are minor like cuts, scratches, bruises, and welts. Others are more serious and can cause death or disabilities. These include broken bones, internal bleeding, and head trauma.

Not all injuries are physical. IPV can also cause emotional harm. Victims may have trauma symptoms. This includes flashbacks, panic attacks, and trouble sleeping. Victims often have low self-esteem. They may have a hard time trusting others and being in relationships. The anger and stress that victims feel may lead to eating disorders and depression. Some victims even think about or commit suicide.

IPV is also linked to negative health outcomes, such as chronic pain, difficulty sleeping, activity limitations, and poor physical and mental health.

IPV is also linked to harmful health behaviors. Victims may try to cope with their trauma in unhealthy ways. This includes smoking, drinking, taking drugs, or having risky sex.

 How can we prevent IPV?

The goal is to stop IPV before it begins. There is a lot to learn about how to prevent IPV. We do know that strategies that promote healthy behaviors in relationships are important. Programs that teach young people skills for dating can prevent violence. These programs can stop violence in dating relationships before it occurs.

We know less about how to prevent IPV in adults. However, some programs that teach healthy relationship skills seem to help stop violence before it ever starts. Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. Domestic violence occurs in both opposite-sex and same-sex relationships and can happen to intimate partners who are married, living together, or dating.

Domestic violence not only affects those who are abused, but also has a substantial effect on family members, friends, co-workers, other witnesses, and the community at large. Children, who grow up witnessing domestic violence, are among those seriously affected by this crime. Frequent exposure to violence in the home not only predisposes children to numerous social and physical problems, but also teaches them that violence is a normal way of life—therefore, increasing their risk of becoming society’s next generation of victims and abusers.

 Getting Help

If you are someone you know is effected by any form of domestic abuse or violence we encourage you to download or share the free resources below providing information on how help can be found.

Domestic Violence Resources

Domestic Violence Hotlines

State Child Abuse Reporting Numbers

Shelter for Pets of Domestic Violence Victims

Celebration of Confucius’ Birthday

Confucius’s Birthday           (Teacher’s Day)

September 28

A time to commemorate the birth of the teacher Confucius, perhaps the most influential man in China’s history. In Qufu, Shandong Province, China, the birthplace of Confucius, there is a two-week-long Confucian Culture Festival. In Hong Kong, observances are held by the Confucian Society at the Confucius Temple at Causeway Bay near this date. Confucius, the Latinized version of the name K’ung-fu-tzu, was born in 551 B.C.E. during the Warring States Period and developed a system of ethics and politics that stressed five virtues: charity, justice, propriety, wisdom, and loyalty. His teachings were recorded by his followers in the Analects and formed the code of ethics called Confucianism that is still the cornerstone of Chinese thought. It taught filial obedience, respect, and selflessness; the Confucian “golden rule” is “Do not do unto others what you would not want others to do unto you.” Confucius died at the age of 73 in 479 B.C.E.

During the Cultural Revolution, Confucianism lost favor, and in the late 1960s Red Guards defaced many of the buildings in Qufu. They have since been restored, and the festival held there from late September into October attracts scholars from China and abroad. The festival opens with a ceremony accompanied by ancient music and dance and includes exhibitions and lectures on the life and teachings of Confucius and on Chinese customs.

Commemorations in Taiwan take the form of dawn services at the Confucian temples. The Confucius Temple in Tainan was built in 1665 by Gen. Chen Yunghua of the Ming Dynasty and is the oldest Confucian temple in Taiwan.

CONTACTS                                                                                               Taiwan Government Information Office                                                    4201 Wisconsin Ave. N.W.                                                             Washington, D.C. 20016 United States                                                       202-895-1850; fax: 202-362-6144                             www.taiwanembassy.org

To learn more about holidays, festivals, commemorations, holy days, feasts and fasts, and other observances from all parts of the world check out the latest edition of Holidays Around the World 2018.

Citizenship Day – September 17

Citizenship Day

September 17th

Citizenship Day is an outgrowth of two earlier patriotic celebrations. As the anniversary of the signing of the Constitution of the United States in 1787, September 17 was first observed in Philadelphia shortly after the outbreak of the Civil War as Constitution Day. Then in 1940 Congress set aside the third Sunday in May as ”I Am an American” Day, which honored those who had become U.S. citizens during the preceding year. The two holidays were combined in 1952 and called Citizenship Day. A number of states and cities hold special exercises on September 17 to focus attention on the rights and obligations of citizenship. Schools make a special effort to acquaint their students with the history and importance of the Constitution. Naturalization ceremonies, re-creations of the signing of the Constitution, and parades are other popular ways of celebrating Citizenship Day. Several states observe the entire week in which this day occurs as Constitution Week.

Additional information about Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World, including an explanation of calendar systems around the world; facts about the U.S. states and territories; U.S. presidents; legal holidays by state and by country; domestic and international tourism sources; bibliography; and the chronological, special subject, and general indexes can be found in  Holidays Around the World 2018, 6th Ed.

 

Just Released: Mental Health Information for Teens, 5th Edition

Adolescence is difficult. Not only are teens under stress to be liked, do well in school, and get along with family, they must cope with hormonal changes and make important decisions about their lives. Continue reading “Just Released: Mental Health Information for Teens, 5th Edition”

Just Released: Stroke Sourcebook, 4th Edition

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), stroke kills nearly 130,000 Americans each year—one out of every 18 deaths— making stroke the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Continue reading “Just Released: Stroke Sourcebook, 4th Edition”

Just Released: Pregnancy Information for Teens, 3rd Ed.

According to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. teenage birth rate reached a historic low in 2015, at 22.3 births per 1,000 women aged 15–19. Despite this encouraging news, the U.S. teenage birth rate retained its distinction of
being the highest among industrialized countries, emphasizing the nation’s need for continued efforts at helping young women avoid unplanned pregnancies.

Continue reading “Just Released: Pregnancy Information for Teens, 3rd Ed.”

May Is Mental Health Month

Mental health issues affect a large segment of society in the United States — adults, young adults, and children. In a give year, approximately one in five adults (43.8 million, or 18.5%) and the same proportion of young adults aged 13 to 18 (one in five, or 21.4%) experience some form of mental illness. And younger children are not immune — for those aged 8 to 15, the estimate is 13%.

Continue reading “May Is Mental Health Month”

Just Released: Eye Care Sourcebook, 5th Edition

Recent statistics show that more than 39 million Americans have low vision or a disorder that can lead to it. Together these impairments cost $68 billion in annual direct healthcare costs, as well as lost productivity and diminished quality of life.

Continue reading “Just Released: Eye Care Sourcebook, 5th Edition”

Just Released: Savings and Investment Information for Teens, 3rd Edition

The financial services market offers today’s consumers a wide variety of products, services, and providers to choose from to meet their financial needs. While this degree of choice provides a great number of options, it also requires that consumers be equipped with the information, knowledge, and skills to evaluate their options and identify those that best suit their needs and circumstances.

Continue reading “Just Released: Savings and Investment Information for Teens, 3rd Edition”

Just Released: Suicide Information for Teens, 3rd Edition

 

Teens often face a host of stressors and confusing feelings as they grow through the adolescent years. The emotions associated with puberty, self-doubt, confusion about the future, family problems, and school pressures can sometimes seem overwhelming.

Continue reading “Just Released: Suicide Information for Teens, 3rd Edition”