World AIDS Day 2017

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 1.2 million Americans are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

An estimated 50,000 people in the United States are newly infected with HIV each year. This devastating disease attacks the immune system and affects all parts of the body, eventually leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), it’s most deadly and advanced stage, for which there is currently no cure. Yet there is hope for the many Americans living with HIV infection or AIDS. Researchers are developing new and more effective drug combinations, and scientists are growing ever closer to a vaccine. Improvements in medication and earlier diagnosis mean that those infected with HIV are living longer, healthier, and more productive lives. Still, many Americans are unaware of even the basic facts about HIV—how it is transmitted, how HIV progresses to AIDS, and how HIV and AIDS are treated.

World AIDS Day is important because it reminds the public and government that HIV has not gone away – there is still a vital need to raise money, increase awareness, fight prejudice and improve education.

The fight is not just about the virus. For people living with HIV, ignorance and discrimination can still limit opportunities, preventing them from living full and happy lives. HIV means you are more likely to live in poverty, and more likely to have poor mental health.

In an effort to end stigma, end HIV transmission and end the isolation experienced by people living with HIV, for good please download and share Chapter 36 of AIDS Sourcebook, Sixth Edition, which offers advice on coping with an HIV/AIDS diagnosis.

Download “Coping with an HIV/AIDS Diagnosis” from AIDS Sourcebook, Sixth Edition here.

For additional resources and information on World AIDS Day please visit www.worldaidsday.org.

National Diabetes Month 2017

Diabetes is a chronic disorder characterized by high levels of blood sugar. It can lead to a host of complications, including heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, blindness, kidney disease, nervous system disease, and limb amputation. Although many of the complications of diabetes occur over long periods of time, poorly controlled blood glucose levels can also result in acute medical emergencies, such as seizures or coma or even death.

The number of people with diabetes in the United States is growing. According to the 2014 publication from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 29.1 million children and adults in the United States are living with diabetes. Among people aged twenty and older, 208,000 people have been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2). Furthermore, an estimated 86 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. Despite its prevalence, many Americans are unaware of the basic facts about diabetes and the progress being made in the fight against it. For example, new forms of treatment are being developed making it easier to manage, and work on pancreatic islet transplantation and an artificial pancreas offer hope for an eventual cure.

Diabetes Sourcebook, Sixth Edition provides basic consumer health information about the different types of diabetes and how they are diagnosed. Specifically, Chapter 8 covers the importance of eating healthy and how diet and nutrition effects ones body as it pertains to Diabetes prevention and management.

Questions answered in this chapter include:

  • Why eat healthy foods?
  • How does food affect my body?
  • What should I eat?
  • What about sugar, sweets, and desserts? Am I allowed to eat them again?
  • How much should I eat?
  • What happens when I eat foods containing carbohydrates?
  • How much carbohydrate do I need each day?
  • How can I find out how much carbohydrate is in the foods I eat?

In efforts to spread awareness of Diabetes and in honor of National Diabetes Month please feel free to download Chapter 8 of Diabetes Sourcebook, 6th Ed. here for free.