Women’s Health Week: Make Your Health a Priority

Statistics indicate that women—on average—live approximately five years longer than men, but this longevity, unfortunately, is not linked to better overall health. According to the Health Resources and Services Administration, women have more physically and mentally unhealthy days than men. Part of this disparity is related to age; because of their longer life expectancy, women are at greater risk for age-related conditions, like Alzheimer disease. Beyond that, however, women experience gender-specific health care needs throughout their lives and are more likely than men to have certain conditions, including asthma, arthritis, migraine headaches, osteoporosis, thyroid disorders, and chronic pain.

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May Is Mental Health Month

Mental health issues affect a large segment of society in the United States — adults, young adults, and children. In a give year, approximately one in five adults (43.8 million, or 18.5%) and the same proportion of young adults aged 13 to 18 (one in five, or 21.4%) experience some form of mental illness. And younger children are not immune — for those aged 8 to 15, the estimate is 13%.

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